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The first wooden satellite sends strange "experimental" sensors into space |  Europe

The first wooden satellite sends strange “experimental” sensors into space | Europe

The Moon was built using standard cubes with plywood surface panels, with its hull made only of wood, with the exception of the aluminum rods used to launch it into space.

The world’s first wooden satellite is scheduled to be sent into space this year, with a payload that includes a number of experimental sensors.

In a report published by The Independent,independent(British, Adam Smith reported that “Wissa Woodsat”)WISA and Woodsat) a nano-satellite with an area of ​​10 square centimeters, and it belongs specifically to the CubeSat.

Moon built using standard cubes with plywood surface plates (ESA)

properties of the nano moon

The Moon was built using standard cubes of plywood surface panels, with its hull made only of wood, with the exception of the aluminum rods used to launch it into space, and one selfie stick.

Wissa Woodsat will reach an altitude of between 500 and 600 km in space, and its structure is expected to survive exposure to atomic oxygen, which is caused by intense ultraviolet light that decomposes oxygen molecules from two atoms to one atom only.

However, its wood will darken due to exposure to light. As such, the selfie stick will be a key component to monitor for any updates, such as discoloration or the appearance of cracks.

Somali Neiman, chief engineer for Woodsat and co-founder of Arctic Astronatics, explains that the base material for plywood is birch, which means we use essentially the same wood that is typically used in hardware stores, or to make furniture.

Wissa Woodsat reaches an altitude of 500-600 km in space (European Space Agency)

“The main difference is that ordinary plywood is too hygroscopic for aerospace applications, so we put our wood in a vacuum chamber to dry it,” Neiman notes. “Then we carry out the atomic layer deposition process by adding a very thin layer of aluminum oxide that is usually used to encapsulate electronics.” .

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“This would reduce the release of unwanted fumes from wood, what is known as the phenomenon of outgassing in the space field, as well as provide protection against the corrosive effects of atomic oxygen. We will test coatings such as varnish and lacquer on some parts of the wood as well,” he added.

moon fixtures

The writer indicated that the cube moon will carry a set of experimental sensors provided by the European Space Agency (ESA), which plans to provide assistance in the moon launch process. statement About the project on the tenth of June.

“The schedule was tight, but we would welcome the opportunity to contribute to Woodsat’s payload in exchange for help in evaluating its suitability for flight,” said Riccardo Rambini, head of ESA’s Department of Physics and Chemistry of Materials.

The cube moon will carry an array of experimental sensors provided by the European Space Agency (ESA)

He continues, “The first device that we will attach is a pressure sensor, which allows us to identify the local pressure in cavities on the Moon in the hours and days after launch into orbit. This is an important factor for the operation of high-power systems and radio frequency antennas, because small amounts of particles in any cavity may harm her.”

According to Rampini, other sensors include a light-emitting diode with a photoresistor that senses its light and gets its power from an electrically conductive 3D-printed plastic source.

The final sensor is a quartz crystal microbalance, a sensitive pollution monitoring instrument for measuring nanograms of deposits from the electronics carried on the Moon, as well as the wooden surfaces themselves. Woodsat also has a radio payload for amateurs, allowing them to transmit radio signals and images from around the world to the satellite.

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